Ancient wall carvings suggest women used ‘modern’ accessory 12,000 years ago

Ancient wall carvings suggest women used 'modern' accessory 12,000 years ago

Ancient wall carvings suggest women used ‘modern’ accessory 12,000 years ago

Women’s’ relationship with handbags may date back thousands of years.



Researchers have discovered ancient wall carvings depicting what appeared to be handbags designed with a square case and short, half circle handle.

Some date back 12,000 years, which predates makeup, perfume and hairbrushes. 

The earliest imagery was discovered in Turkey among the ruins of Göbekli Tepe, an ancient megalithic temple, which featured large stone pillars etched with bags.

Researchers have uncovered the same design in Mexico, Iraq and parts of South America, raising even more questions about the meaning of the motif – specifically how distant civilizations imagined the same object.

The earliest imagery was discovered in Turkey among the ruins of Göbekli Tepe, an ancient megalithic temple, which featured large stone pillars etched with bags

The Göbekli Tepe was built in 9,000 BC, featuring large, T-shaped stone pillars arranged in circles that were likely used for social events and rituals

While the images are nearly identical to modern-day purses, experts have suggested that many of the images are of baskets.

But some have also argued that the idea of a handbag could have been created by ancient civilizations.  

The first modern handbag was designed in 1841 England by Samuel Parkinson, who needed a traveling case for his wife that could carry her belongings which were too big for a purse. 

Since then, the accessory has become a must have fashion item among both women and men. 

The most expensive handbag ever is the Mouawad 1001 Nights Diamond Purse that costs $3.8 million 

The Göbekli Tepe was built in 9,000 BC, featuring large, T-shaped stone pillars arranged in circles that were likely used for social events and rituals,

Some of its structures feature of what appeared to be clothing, belts, loincloths and handbags.

While experts do not know exactly what the motifs mean, they have theorized that ancient humans saw the design in relation to the cosmos, Live Mint reported.

Archaeologists have made similar discoveries in Iraq when they uncovered the Relief with Winged Genie in 1846, which was a relief that once stood in a palace between 883 and 859 BC

Many experts have agreed that it was made to carry magic potions that the genie would sprinkle throughout the halls, but other translations have suggested the art shows a purse filled with intoxicants

The square ‘bag’ may stand for the Earth and the connected circle was a symbol of spirituality. 

Ancient text has shown that past civilizations believed the Earth was flat, which may be why they showed it as a square in their art. 

However, some researchers have argued that the design was the connection between our planet and the sky.

Another early example of a clutch has been found in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, made about 5,000 years ago, which show gods carrying a small, square purse that symbolized prosperity.

And while archaeologists have found evidence of baskets and tool bags used by the civilization, they have yet to uncover what has been found etched in walls. 

Archaeologists have made similar discoveries in Iraq.

Giant rock slabs found among the ruins of a Assyrian palace built between 883 and 859 BC depicted Genie’s with wings who carried a handbag.

The structure features a genie with large, feathered wings holding what some have claimed is a handbag – while others are sure it is a small bucket.

Many experts have agreed that it was made to carry magic potions that the genie would sprinkle throughout the halls, but other translations have suggested the art shows a purse filled with intoxicants.

Historian Dr David Miano said in a recent YouTube video: ‘These figures on the Assyrian palaces often have human bodies and animal heads, they’re called the Apkalu.’ 

The same motif has also been found in Tula, Mexico among ruins created by the Toltecs

Giant stone statues on top of the Star Pyramid show figures clutching a handbag to their side - the structures were created in 750AD

He continued to explain that they are minor deities with the power of protect, which has been determined in ancient writings.

‘They’re carrying these things that people call handbags, but in reality they’re buckets these are buckets to carry water sacred date palms,’ said Dr Miano, noting archaeologists have found ancient buckets in Iraq that look similar to the etchings.

He noted that archaeologists have uncovered the actually buckets in the region. 

The same motif has also been found in Tula, Mexico among ruins created by the Toltecs, which shows a human-like figure holding a bag while surrounded by a snake.

Giant stone statues in Tula also  show figures clutching a handbag to their side – the structures were created in 750AD. 

‘[A handbag] is a very simple device, anyone could come up with that,’ said Dr Miano.

‘You don’t need to learn it from another culture, you can invent it yourself.’ 

Source: daily mail

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Ancient wall carvings suggest women used ‘modern’ accessory 12,000 years ago

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