A giant monument twice the size of Stonehenge rests at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee

A giant monument twice the size of Stonehenge rests at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee

A giant monument twice the size of Stonehenge rests at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee

In 2003, a team of researchers from Tel Aviv University in Israel discovered a mysterious giant monument submerged in the Sea of Galilee. (The Sea of Galilee is the lowest freshwater lake on Earth.) The discovery has been described in the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology.

The scientists were surveying the bottom of the Sea of Galilee with sonar when they detected the ancient structure which was 33 feet underwater. The structure was an asymmetric, circular structure that resembled a large mound. The mound was composed of basalt rocks in the shape of a cone.

The base of the structure was 230 feet while its height was 32 feet. It would have weighed an estimated 60,000 tons and was reported to be twice the size of Stonehenge.

The mysterious, circular structure was difficult to date but it is thought to be between 2000 and 12000 years old.

Scientists believe that the giant structure is a cairn which is simply a man-made pile of stones. However, the purpose of the cairn submerged within the Sea of Galilee remains a mystery.

Archaeologists propose different theories for its existence. One is that the structure was built underground to attract fish. There have been similar structures found in the Sea of Galilee except none were as large.

Another theory is that the structure was first built on land and then submerged within the lake by rising water or a lowered ground surface as a result of tectonics.

The structure has been difficult to study because it remains underwater.

Source: newsbreak.com

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A giant monument twice the size of Stonehenge rests at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee

2 thoughts on “A giant monument twice the size of Stonehenge rests at the bottom of the Sea of Galilee

  • danodelion

    Perhaps the tomb of Miriam, sister of Moses, and subsequent filling by springwater or flooding led to legend of Miriam’s Well.

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